ҹѰ

Help

Reprints, Photocopies, and Licensing of Content

Education Week’s content is protected by copyright. Except as described on this page, Education Week’s content (text, photographs, videos, etc.) may only be used with its consent.

Education Week may not be the copyright owner of all content appearing in its print or digital editions. For example, if an article or photograph is credited to a source other than Education Week (such as The Associated Press or Getty Images), that source is likely the owner of the copyright in the material. You should contact them directly to seek permission to use their content.

Below are answers to frequently asked questions regarding the use and licensing of Education Week content. If you need additional assistance, please contact us at reprints@educationweek.org.

Frequently Asked Questions

You may hyperlink to Education Week content—including articles, photographs, videos or other multimedia or infographics—as long as you do not state or imply that Education Week sponsors or endorses your site or any of your products or services. You may also embed one of our videos on your site in a manner that does not suggest that it is your content. When linking to our articles, you are permitted to use our headline and include a few sentences from our article in a manner that makes clear that Education Week is the publisher. Here is an example of permissible hyperlinking to our site:

Vision, Reality Collide in Common-Core Tests - Education Week
In states across the country, field-testing of the exams that will measure students’ mastery of the Common Core State Standards is well underway. Much attention is focusing on the questions that this “testing of the test” will inevitably raise about bandwidth, access for special populations, and standard-setting.

Hyperlinking to or emailing articles will allow most non-subscribers to access them. You can see our

For all Education Week publications with the exception of ҹѰ Market Brief, you may email the full text of an Education Week article to up to five (5) people for personal, noncommercial use only. You must keep intact all copyright or other proprietary notices that appear on such material. If you wish to email the full text of an article to more than five (5) people or for commercial use, or any other purpose—or if you wish to email an ҹѰ Market Brief article—please send your request to reprints@educationweek.org.

Your request should (i) identify yourself and/or publication, including your contact information; (ii) identify the content you wish to email (a hyperlink or headline and date of publication); (iii) describe the purpose of your intended email distribution, and (iv) include how many people you wish to distribute the content to.

You may email hyperlinks to our content—along with our headline and a few sentences of the article—to as many people as you wish.

You may print or photocopy Education Week content on a limited basis for personal, non-commercial use without permission. For all Education Week publications with the exception of ҹѰ Market Brief, you can make up to five (5) copies of an article (photocopies or printed copies) for personal, noncommercial use. For ҹѰ Market Brief, you can make one (1) copy (photocopy or printed copy) of an article for personal, noncommercial use. You must keep intact all copyright or other proprietary notices that appear on such material. You may not otherwise reproduce copies of any Education Week content in any form without prior written consent. If you’d like to make copies beyond these limits or for commercial use, or any other purpose, please send your request to reprints@educationweek.org.

Your request should (i) identify yourself and/or publication, including your contact information; (ii) identify the content you wish to copy (a hyperlink or headline and date of publication); (iii) describe the purpose of your intended copying, and (iv) include how many copies you wish to make.

It may be permissible to quote from an Education Week article on a limited basis. Whether permission is required depends on the context of the quotes, the number of quotes used, and the length of the quotes. You should never use an excessive number of quotes or use them in a manner that will change their meaning or create a misleading impression. It is best to seek permission to quote from Education Week articles if you are uncertain about the permissibility of your intended usage. Please send your request to reprints@educationweek.org.

Your request should (i) identify yourself and/or publication, including your contact information; (ii) identify the content you wish to quote (a hyperlink or headline and date of publication); and (iii) describe your intended use (educational or commercial; duration of expected use; print or online, etc.)

Use of photographs, videos, infographics, or other multimedia content appearing in Education Week’s print or digital platforms requires advance permission from Education Week or, if applicable, another copyright holder of that content. If you wish to use such content, please send your request to reprints@educationweek.org.

Your request should (i) identify yourself and/or publication, including your contact information; (ii) identify the content you wish to use (a hyperlink or headline and date of publication); and (iii) describe your intended use (educational or commercial; duration of expected use; print or online; documentary, broadcast, etc.). If you are requesting use of a portion of a video, please identify the portion you wish to use via timestamps from the clip.

If the photograph or other multimedia content you seek to use is credited to a source other than Education Week (for example, The Associated Press or Getty Images), you should contact that source for permission to use the content.

If your school district or university has a group subscription to Education Week or ҹѰ Market Brief, all your students and colleagues should be able to read the content you share with them through a simple hyperlink. If your institution does not have a group subscription, learn more about getting one.

If you would like to use Education Week content in your university classroom and your institution does not have a group subscription, please check with your librarian to see whether your institution has a Copyright Clearance Center license. Education Week content can be licensed through the .

If you would like to use ҹѰ Market Brief content and your institution does not have a group subscription, please contact reprints@educationweek.org for pricing.

Your request should (i) identify yourself and/or publication, including your contact information; (ii) identify the content you wish to use (a hyperlink or headline and date of publication); and (iii) describe your intended use (educational or commercial; duration of expected use; print or online; documentary, broadcast, etc.).

To order a print issue of Education Week published within the past year, please contact customer service. For issues published more than a year ago, please contact reprints@educationweek.org.

Education Week contains content that is protected by copyrights owned by Education Week or its partners. Except as described on this page, you may not republish, modify, edit, adapt, transmit, distribute, sell, or otherwise commercially exploit our content without our consent. This restriction includes, but is not limited to, screenshots, embedded PDFs, or copied and pasted text.

If you wish to use or reprint any Education Week content beyond the limited scope described on this page, please email your request to reprints@educationweek.org.

Your request should (i) identify yourself and/or publication, including your contact information; (ii) identify the content you wish to use (a hyperlink or headline and date of publication); and (iii) describe your intended use (educational or commercial; duration of expected use; print or online, etc.)